liquorice root bundle naturally sweet tasting roots from the plant Glycyrrhiza Glabra used to make liquorice confectionery sold by www.valentines-liquorice.uk

Natural Liquorice

Natural Liquorice is over 50 times sweeter than sugar, thus making it the sweetest naturally occurring compound on this planet. Herbal Liquorice recipes often use it, because they are versatile and accessible. We have found the benefits of natural liquorice too long to list. What we can say is it contains active compounds that have far-reaching potential health benefits.

Did you know that because it has unique health properties, the pharmaceutical industry uses harvested natural liquorice? We extract liquorice from the roots of a plant. Glycyrrhiza Glabra (Sweet Root). In the industry, the resulting product is called Liquorice Extract. Nature has gifted the Liquorice plant with super health qualities that have been used to treat health issues since the earliest times. The confectionery industry only uses some.

It is extracted from the fresh roots of the plant by a superheating and evaporation process. It takes about 8 hours to reduce the mass to a tar-like substance called liquorice extract. The next stage is cooling, and this makes it manageable. The extract is ground in a pulverising machine to create a powder. This stuff is golden to the specialist liquorice manufacturing industry.

natural liquorice roots

Glycyrrhiza glabra (family Fabaceae), commonly known as liquorice, is a herbaceous perennial and has been used as a flavouring agent in foods and medicinal remedies for thousands of years. Liquorice root has been widely used around the world to treat cough since ancient times. It contains active compounds, including Glycyrrhizin, glycyrrhetinic acid, flavonoids, isoflavonoids, and chalcones. Glycyrrhizin and glycyrrhetinic acid are considered to be the main active components and are potent inhibitors of cortisol metabolism, due to their steroid-like structures. The root of this plant has been used for cough, colds, asthma, and COPD (Ram et al., 2011).

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